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FRASER, Donald. Winning a primitive people. Sixteen years'work among the warlike tribe of the Ngoni and the Senga and Tumbuka peoples of Central Africa. With an introduction by J.R. Mott. London, Seeley, Service & Co., 1914.Original blue cloth, with gilt vignette to upper cover, spine lettered in gilt (sl. soiled). With 2 maps and 27 photographic illustrations. 315 pp. First edition. - The author belonged to the Livingstonia Mission in Nyasaland, British Central Africa, which was founded in 1875, in memory of the great African traveller. [Boeknr.: 24822 ]

€ 45,00

LIVINGSTONE, David. Missionary travels and researches in South Africa including a sketch of sixteen years' residence in the interior of Africa. London, Ward, Lock & Co., (1899).Original decorated cloth gilt. With portrait and photographic plates.XV,617 pp. First published in 1857. - In 1852 Livingstone asked his family to join him in Africa. With the help of the Makololos, a South African tribe, Livingstone planned to explore the whole of southern Africa as far as Angola. The missionary had become an important explorer. As the first European, he traveled on the Zambezi to Kazembe in a pirogue, a fast water vessel made from a tree trunk. In order to escape from the slave traders of Portuguese Africa, Livingstone traveled via Cassange and Bihé to Luanda, a Portuguese port and the capital of Angola, where he arrived completely exhausted on 31 May, 1854. As soon as he had recovered from his fever, he undertook a trek to Lake Dilolo, discovered the source of the Kasai, a left tributary of the Congo, and arrived in Linyanti, the capital of the Makololos. In the course of the major Zambezi expedition that followed he discovered the Victoria Falls, the falls of the middle Zambezi, in 1855 (Waldmann, Ecyclopedia of world explorers, p.226).Mendelssohn I, p.908-10; SAB III, p.136; Hess & Coger 3068. [Boeknr.: 32254 ]

€ 75,00

LIVINGSTONE, David. Missionary travels and researches in South Africa. New edition. London, John Murray, 1899.Original decorated cloth, top edge gilt. With 2 maps on 1 folding leaf and 51 illustrations and plates. XIV,447 pp. First published in 1857. - In 1852 Livingstone asked his family to join him in Africa. With the help of the Makololos, a South African tribe, Livingstone planned to explore the whole of southern Africa as far as Angola. The missionary had become an important explorer. As the first European, he traveled on the Zambezi to Kazembe in a pirogue, a fast water vessel made from a tree trunk. In order to escape from the slave traders of Portuguese Africa, Livingstone traveled via Cassange and Bihé to Luanda, a Portuguese port and the capital of Angola, where he arrived completely exhausted on 31 May, 1854. As soon as he had recovered from his fever, he undertook a trek to Lake Dilolo, discovered the source of the Kasai, a left tributary of the Congo, and arrived in Linyanti, the capital of the Makololos. In the course of the major Zambezi expedition that followed he discovered the Victoria Falls, the falls of the middle Zambezi, in 1855 (Waldmann, Ecyclopedia of world explorers, p.226).Mendelssohn I, p.908-10; SAB III, p.136; Hess & Coger 3068. [Boeknr.: 32255 ]

€ 95,00

LIVINGSTONE, David. Narrative of an expedition to the Zambesi and its tributaries; and of the discovery of the lakes Shirwa and Nysassa. 1858-1864. New York, Harper & Brothers, 1866.Original cloth (spine discoloured (one hinge sl. dam.). With double-page plate of the Falls at Zambesi, large folding map, and 36 woodengraved plates and illustrations. XXII,638; 6 pp. First American edition; first published in London in 1865; with the armorial bookplate of Frederick C. Bradley. - Account of Livingstone's second expedition.The British government agreed to fund Livingstone's idea and he returned to Africa as head of the Second Zambesi Expedition to examine the natural resources of southeastern Africa and open up the Zambezi River. However, it turned out to be completely impassable to boats past the Cahora Bassa rapids, a series of cataracts and rapids that Livingstone had failed to explore on his earlier travels. He eventually returned home in 1864 after the government ordered the recall of the expedition because of its increasing costs and failure to find a navigable route to the interior. The Zambezi Expedition was castigated as a failure in many newspapers of the time, and Livingstone experienced great difficulty in raising funds to further explore Africa. Mendelssohn I, p.915; SAB III, p.137; Howgego IV, p.553-555; Hess & Coger 3069. [Boeknr.: 34994 ]

€ 275,00

LIVINGSTONE, David. Missionary travels and researches in South Africa; including a sketch of sixteen years' residence in the interior of Africa, and a journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loanda on the west coast; thence across the continent, down the river Zambesi, to the eastern ocean. London, John Murray, 1857.Contempoary calf, spine gilt (sl. rubbed; one hinge sl. dam. but holding). With folding wood-engraved frontispiece depicting the Victoria Falls by Whymper, engraved portrait (margins foxed), a folding cross section, 2 folding maps and 42 wood-engraved plates and illustrations. X,687pp. First edition, first issue. - An account of Livingstone's first expedition (1853-1856). With the help of the Makololos, a South African tribe, Livingstone planned to explore the whole of southern Africa as far as Angola. The missionary had become an important explorer. As the first European, he traveled on the Zambezi to Kazembe in a pirogue, a fast water vessel made from a tree trunk. In order to escape from the slave traders of Portuguese Africa, Livingstone traveled via Cassange and Bihé to Luanda, a Portuguese port and the capital of Angola, where he arrived completely exhausted on 31 May, 1854. As soon as he had recovered from his fever, he undertook a trek to Lake Dilolo, discovered the source of the Kasai, a left tributary of the Congo, and arrived in Linyanti, the capital of the Makololos. In the course of the major Zambezi expedition that followed he discovered the Victoria Falls, the falls of the middle Zambezi, in 1855 (Waldmann, Ecyclopedia of world explorers, p.226). 'Livingstone's services to African geography. are almost unequalled. he explored vast regions of central Africa, many of which had never been seen by white men before' (Printing and the Mind of Man 341). - Some foxing as usual , first fly-leaf missing, otherwise fine.Mendelssohn I, p.908-10; SAB III, p.136; Gordon-Brown p. 190-191; Hess & Coger 3067. [Boeknr.: 9607 ]

€ 450,00


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